Introduction

The microbes on our food that can cause food poisoning are usually controlled by heating (cooking) and/or chilling (refrigerating) our food, but given the chance they can easily spread around the kitchen – via our hands, chopping boards, cloths, knives and other utensils.

If they are allowed to cross-contaminate other foods – especially cooked and ready to eat foods – they can make us ill. Good kitchen hygiene and good personal hygiene are important to help control the spread of harmful germs.

Kitchen Hygiene

Clean kitchen surfaces after preparing food. Try to 'clean as you go'. Remember that raw meat, poultry, fish and other raw foods can easily cross-contaminate other foods. After handling these foods always wash hands, utensils and surfaces thoroughly and before any contact with other food, especially cooked and ready to eat foods.

After use, wash all crockery and utensils with hot water and washing up liquid. Change the water regularly then rinse in clean, hot water. Where possible leave to drain until dry. Tea towels can be a source of cross-contamination so use them sparingly; make sure they dry out after you've used them, change them regularly and wash in a hot wash cycle. Preferably, use disposable cloths or paper towels.

If you have a dishwasher use the right amounts of salt and
detergent and keep the filter and all surfaces clean.The highest
temperature cycle will be most effective against germs.

Cleaning Materials

  • Detergents such as washing up liquids are designed to dissolve grease,
    oil and dirt.
  • Disinfectants, such as bleach, are designed to kill germs. These are
    powerful agents and should not be used indiscriminately.
  • Anti-bacterial cleaners are types of disinfectant and can kill germs. They
    often come in spray form.

Disinfectants and anti-bacterial cleaners won't work if you don't use them properly, so always follow
the instructions. Always clean surfaces first with detergent to remove any grease and dirt, and then apply disinfectant
to kill any remaining germs. Use separate cloths or sponges for separate tasks; where practicable use disposable cloths.
If using them more than once, wash in hot water and soap then place in a suitable disinfectant, rinse thoroughly and allow to dry.
Do not soak overnight as disinfectant solutions weaken and may allow bacteria to grow.

Rubbish

Clean kitchen surfaces after preparing food. Try to 'clean as you go'. Remember that raw meat, poultry, fish and other raw foods can easily cross-contaminate other foods. After handling these foods always wash hands, utensils and surfaces thoroughly and before any contact with other food, especially cooked and ready to eat foods.

After use, wash all crockery and utensils with hot water and washing up liquid. Change the water regularly then rinse in clean, hot water. Where possible leave to drain until dry. Tea towels can be a source of cross-contamination so use them sparingly; make sure they dry out after you've used them, change them regularly and wash in a hot wash cycle. Preferably, use disposable cloths or paper towels.

If you have a dishwasher use the right amounts of salt and detergent and keep the filter and all surfaces clean. The highest temperature cycle will be most effective against germs.